Teleprompter Challenge: Artificial Intelligence and Language Preservation

Teleprompter challenges are an excellent way to practice pronunciation, reading fluency, and public speaking skills.

Your task is to record the text below while reading a teleprompter. Try to sound as clear and natural as possible. You can use the video below to practice and record or you can use any teleprompter site or app you like. If you upload the video recording to YouTube or Flipgrid, you’ll be able to use automatic closed captioning to check the accuracy of your pronunciation.  Good Luck!

Site/Apps that might be of use:

Video: 

Text (232 words)

There is tremendous interest in Artificial Intelligence technologies that can interpret human language in various ways. Chatbots, translation software, and intelligent assistants like Siri or Alexa all depend on an understanding of how we use language.

A few weeks ago, the non-profit research company OpenAI published a paper demonstrating their new approach to computational modeling of the English language. The authors give a number of examples of computer-generated texts from their new model that they say are indistinguishable from what a human might produce. OpenAI has decided not to release the model for fear that it might be misused to create malicious bots on Twitter or other social media platforms.

As always, this could mean both good news and bad news for indigenous and minority languages. The good news is that these models don’t require any special data to train; they can be built as long as programmers have a sufficiently large collection of text in the target language. Once a model is created, it can be used to develop more advanced AI technologies in that language.

A few bits of bad news: first, these models require a huge amount of text to train, many millions or billions of words, and significant computational horsepower. Second, research in this area continues to focus almost 100% on English and there are no guarantees that the same models will work as well for other languages.

Text extracted from GlobalVoices.org

 

* To calculate words per minute, divide the number of words by the time it takes to read the passage (first word to last word).
For example, if it took you 2 minutes and 8 seconds…
2 minutes and 8 seconds = 128 seconds.
128 / 60 = 2.13 minutes.
219 / 2.13 = 103 words/minute.

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